In Brief: Employees taking advantage of payroll deduction for tech purchases, recap of April 'Convo with Cantwell'

In Brief: Employees taking advantage of payroll deduction for tech purchases, recap of April 'Convo with Cantwell'

By University Communications
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Employees can purchase qualifying technology items totaling up to $2,000 through the payroll deduction program. (Photo by Mike Wang/University BookStores)
Employees can purchase qualifying technology items totaling up to $2,000 through the payroll deduction program. (Photo by Mike Wang/University BookStores)
April's "Convo with Cantwell" focused on University research on sustainable agriculture.
April's "Convo with Cantwell" focused on University research on sustainable agriculture.

Thinking about buying a new laptop from the bookstore? Soften the hit on your wallet with this popular payment option

Hundreds of University employees have taken advantage of payroll deduction to buy laptops, tablets and more since Arizona BookStores rolled out the option a few years ago.

The program allows employees to pay for computer hardware and accessories through payroll deduction over six months, or 12 pay periods. Eligible products include laptops, tablets, headphones, speakers, video game consoles, cables, protective cases, adapters and extended warranties on devices.

Many employees have used the payment option multiple times, said Mike Wang, manager of procurement and technology services for Arizona BookStores.

Employees who have worked at the University for at least 180 days and work at least 30 hours per week are eligible for the payroll deduction program. A purchase can include multiple items as long as the total is $2,000 or less. An initial transaction fee of $25 is payable at the time of the purchase, and deductions begin with the next paycheck.

Employees must present their CatCard at the time of purchase, and must completely pay off the balance before making another purchase using payroll deduction.

Read more about eligibility and purchase guidelines on the BookStores website.


April 'Convo with Cantwell' focuses on ag innovation

The April 21 "Convo with Cantwell" focused on the University's research on sustainable agriculture, the impact it has on our health and environment, and the economic impact it has on Arizona.

Panelists included Murat Kacira, director of the Controlled Environment Agriculture Program and professor in the Department of Biosystems Engineering; William Duke Pauli, assistant professor in the School of Plant Sciences; and Paul Brierley, executive director of the Yuma Center of Excellence for Desert Agriculture.

"Convo with Cantwell" is a monthly discussion on Zoom, billed as a fireside chat, that is hosted by Elizabeth "Betsy" Cantwell, senior vice president for research and innovation.

One of the key takeaways from the April conversation was recognition of the impact Cooperative Extension programs have on farmers and agricultural education across the state, allowing the University to take cutting-edge research out into fields and communities.

Technological advances in the lab and in test fields, along with data capture and analysis and new ways of monitoring supply and delivery systems, have made significant contributions to the safety and efficiency of the state’s food supply. And, panelists said, with an educated and forward-thinking farming community, new methods, new crops and new ways to manage water use are leading to more efficient farming methods that will benefit Arizona and beyond.

You can find a recording and transcript of the April chat, as well as previous episodes, on the Research, Innovation & Impact website.

The April "Convo with Cantwell" was the final episode for the spring semester. Episodes will resume in August.

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